Recommended Programs

This resource is supported by one published study.

Resource Overview

Time Allocated

1-6 lessons

Links to National Curriculum

Origin

Australian

Cost

Free

Content Especially Suited For

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders

No Smokes Study Guide

The No Smokes Study Guide provides a suite of resources for teachers to prevent tobacco use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

Available

Year: Year 7–8, Year 9–10, Year 11–12
Targeted Drugs:

Developers

Menzies School of Health Research.

Format

This curriculum-based program is designed to be administered by teachers within classrooms. The program involves 5 modules. No specialist teacher training is required.

Summary

The No Smokes program targets young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and promotes an anti-smoking and healthy choices message. The No Smokes Study Guides are a suite of resources for teachers preventing tobacco use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. The guide includes:

This initiative uses engaging videos including Facts About Smoking, Tobacco Addiction Story (available in English, Walpiri, Pitjantjatjara and Arrernte) and Health Effects Mashup.

Flipcharts are also available, presenting the facts about smoking and your health. Students can also play an engaging game which illustrates positive tobacco prevention messages through a hip-hop dance-off.

Benefits

  • Increases knowledge about the harmful effects of smoking.
  • Increases concern about the negative effects of smoking on friends, family and self.

Evidence

One study has evaluated the benefits of The Facts, Tobacco Addiction Story and Health Effects MashUp using an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander convenience sample. This method is not as rigorous as a randomised controlled trial, which is the gold standard for evaluating the benefits of an intervention. However these preliminary results are promising.

Bell, J. (2012). No Smokes Project summative evaluation report: Findings from qualitative focus groups. Menzies School of Health Research Report.