Drugs A to Z

GHB: Factsheet

  • GHB
  • Avoiding Drugs? You're in the majority.
Year: Year 9–10, Year 11–12
Targeted Drugs:

Resource Overview

Time Allocated

Partial lesson (under 45mins)

Origin

Australian Resource

Cost

Freely available

What is GHB?

GHB is short for gamma-hydroxybutyrate and it is naturally produced in small amounts by the body. It is almost always sold as a clear or blue odourless liquid, usually in a little vial such as fish-shaped sushi soy sauce container and it is normally swallowed. Problems with safety, including concerns about its use as a date rape drug, have led to it being classified as an illegal drug.

Sometimes other substances called GBL and 1,4B are sold as GHB because they have similar effects but may be stronger (increasing the risk of overdose) or more toxic. 

GHB is also known as fantasy, grievous bodily harm, GBH, liquid ecstasy, liquid E, G, or Gina. Although it is sometimes referred to as liquid ecstasy or liquid E, it is not related to ecstasy at all.
 

What are the effects?

Once swallowed, GHB takes around 15–30 minutes to take effect and the effects last for about half an hour.

Effects of GHB vary but may include:

Immediate

  • Increased heart rate and chest pains
  • Drowsiness, passing out, blackouts or memory loss
  • Blurred vision
  • Feeling relaxed
  • Feeling of euphoria (a ‘high’)
  • Lethargy
  • Hot/cold flushes
  • Heavy sweating
  • Confusion and agitation
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Headaches and dizziness
  • Tremors or shaking
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Overdose
  • Seizures
  • Coma.

Long-term

Little is known about the long-term effects of GHB 

Evidence Base

This factsheet was developed following expert review by researchers at the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Mental Health and Substance Use and National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, UNSW. See detailed attachment for a list of sources for this information. 

  • Credit to 2&2 for the 'Avoiding Drugs?' infographic.